Aug 8 • 34M

Willets Pod 12: The Beef In Our Stars

Addy, Allison, Chrystal, and Jesse discuss the Mets' trade deadline acquisitions, specifically the important cosmic balance of Daniel Vogelbach joining Pete Alonso in the lineup... and also dad bods

 
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Editor’s note: During the episode, we talked about Chrystal’s ode to dad bods post, which had yet to run at the time of recording. We decided to just put it here instead of as a separate post, because why make things more complicated than they need to be? We already have an entire podcast devoted to doing that. Also, here’s the time Creed played Thanksgiving for some reason.

You wouldn’t see Nickelback doing that, what with the being Canadian and with Chad Kroeger being too busy having all that sex. Anyway, on to the newsletter portion of today’s program… which is free today as we’re giddy about the Mets taking four of five from Atlanta, but also please consider a paid subscription to support the folks bringing you fun stuff here!

When David Cone (1990 Topps #30) had his 19-strikeout game on the final day of the 1991 season at Veterans Stadium in Philadelphia, he got big support from Keith Miller (1991 Donruss #248), who went 4-for-5 with two doubles and a homer in the 7-0 rout.

Project ShaqBox trivia: Yesterday, Jacob deGrom combined with Joely Rodriguez and Edwin Díaz to strike out 19 Atlanta hitters, tying Tom Seaver and David Cone in individual efforts for the most K’s by Mets pitchers in a nine-inning game. Which team did Seaver’s game, a 2-1 victory on a Wednesday afternoon in April at Shea, come against… and why wasn’t it that team’s most notable time that season being on the short end of a historic pitching performance?

An Ode To Dad Bods

By Chrystal O’Keefe

The great Lizzo once sang, “I like big boys, itty bitty boys,” and that resonated with me. I know women often get criticized for only enjoying the tight pants and baseball butts, and I’m not here to dispel that rumor. Some, like myself, live and breathe baseball, but also enjoy the different body types of players. 

Sure, Starling Marte has abs of steel. Yes, Jacob deGrom could probably be a Calvin Klein model. Does Fransisco Lindor remind me of a young Prince Rogers Nelson, oozing sex appeal? Hell yes. Any hot blooded, man-loving person would surely go for that, I mean, have you seen Michael Kopech? Some of these baseball players are buff, or clearly prioritized squats and leg day in the offseason. And that’s great. But what about the normal-looking guys that weren’t sculpted by the gods?

 

Dad bods have been a thing for quite some time now, even in the baseball world. It’s one of the few sports that allows for multiple body types, and I appreciate that. When the Mets acquired Daniel Vogelbach, I was thrilled. Not only because I knew the power he brings, as someone that is very familiar with the Pirates, but also as someone that appreciates his body type. 

 

With Pete Alonso and Daniel Vogelbach often going back to back in the lineup, I’m thrilled to see peak athletic performances from guys that look like they can smash some ribs, chug a beer, and immediately walk out of the dugout and tattoo a ball out into the concourse. 

Alonso is known for being meaty, and the video of his shirt being ripped off after a bases loaded walk to win the game, showcasing an immaculate dad bod is one of the many reasons I love baseball. (I hope no one goes through my Google searches for this piece.) 

Pete Alonso Joins MLB Network SHIRTLESS

It’s time to normalize the dad bod in baseball. It’s time to appreciate Prince Fielder, Johnny Cueto, Yasmani Grandal, Bartolo “Big Sexy” Colon, CC Sabathia, Lance Lynn, Pete Alonso, Daniel Vogelbach, and the OG dad bod, Babe Ruth. 

If you’re reading this, ESPN, please make one of the above mentioned players the cover of the Body Issue. I promise there is an audience of appreciative dad-bod loving people out here.

And even more after yesterday.

Trivia answer: On April 22, 1970, an Al Ferrara homer and Dave Campbell single were all that stood between Seaver having a 19-strikeout game and Seaver having a 19-strikeout no-hitter. But the San Diego Padres had even more trouble connecting two months later, on June 12, when they drew eight walks in a game against the Pirates, but got no-hit by Dock Ellis, famously under the influence of LSD for the gem.